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Wildflowers and Insects

Here in Shiga Prefecture some wildflowers continue to bloom well into November. They attract a variety of flying insects, including butterflies, moths, bees, hoverflies, and wasps.

On November 3, 2018, quite a few insects were feeding along an irrigation canal near rice and soybean fields near my home.

Common grass yellow butterfly (Eurema hecabe hecabe, キチョウ) on Allium pseudojaponicum (タマムラサキ)
Small white butterfly (Pieris rapae, モンシロチョウ) on a dandelion flower
Beet webworm moth (Spoladea recurvalis, シロオビノメイガ
Giant hoverfly (Phytomia zonata, オオハナアブ
Small branded swift butterfly (Pelopidas mathias, チャバネセセリ

Few insects visit tiny flowers such as henbit dead-nettle (ホトケノザ).

Henbit dead-nettle (Lamium amplexicaule, ホトケノザ) flower

Tall goldenrod (セイタカアワダチソウ) grows beside fields and along rivers and ponds. Many species of insects can be seen on goldenrod flowers.

Goldenrod flowers (セイタカアワダチソウ) in Tsuji, Ritto City
Goldenrod and other weeds along Yasugawa near the tennis courts in Deba, Ritto City

On November 5th, 6th, and 8th, I saw insects on tall goldenrod near the irrigation canal in Tsuji, the riverbank near the tennis courts in Yasugawa Athletic Park (野洲川運動公園), and along Oyamakawa (大山川) in Yasu City.

Harmonia axyridis (ナミテントウ, Asian lady beetle) in Tsuji, Ritto City. This ladybird has many color patterns and many English names.
Harmonia axyridis (ナミテントウ, Asian lady beetle) in Tsuji, Ritto City. This ladybird has many color patterns and many English names.
Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica, ニホンミツバチ)
Female Indian Fritillary butterfly (Argyreus hyperbius, ツマグロヒョウモン)
Female Indian Fritillary butterfly (Argyreus hyperbius, ツマグロヒョウモン) on goldenrod along Oyamakawa in Kitazakura, Yasu City
Male Indian Fritillary butterfly (Argyreus hyperbius, ツマグロヒョウモン) along Yasugawa in Deba, Ritto City
Painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui, ヒメアカタテハ) along Yasugawa in Deba, Ritto City

On November 16th a potter wasp was on tall goldenrod at the reservior near Ono Ramp in Ritto City.

Potter wasp on goldenrod flowers at the reservoir near Ono Ramp (小野ランプ) in Ritto City

Other flowering weeds compete with tall goldenrod. Bidens pilosa (beggar’s tick, コセンダングサ) yellow disc florets continue to attract bees and other small butterflies after the white ray florets fall off.

Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica, ニホンミツバチ)
Long-tailed blue butterfly (Lampides boeticus, ウラナミシジミ

Bidens pilosa fruits come off easily and attach themselves to clothing.

Bidens pilosa (beggar’s tick, コセンダングサ) weed along Yasugawa in Deba, Ritto City

Other flowers have continued to bloom and attract insects in November.

Painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui, ヒメアカタテハ) along the road behind Sakura Ryokuchi in Minamizakura, Yasu City
Asian comma butterfly (Polygonia c-aureum, キタテハ) in Kitazakura, Yasu City
Asian comma butterfly (Polygonia c-aureum, キタテハ) in Kitazakura, Yasu City

After mid-November larger insects such as butterflies are becoming rare.

Small branded swift butterfly (Pelopidas mathias, チャバネセセリ) on a dandelion (Taraxacum officinale, セイヨウタンポポ) in Hayashi, Ritto City


Aging Camellia Flowers

On February 2, 2018, I was looking at a hedge of camellias behind the Ritto City Library (Shiga Prefecture, Japan). Some of the flowers were wilting. As I began to photograph individual flowers, I realized that the aging camellia flowers showed a lot individuality, each displaying a unique shape, texture, and color pattern.

Of course, most photos of camellias (ツバキ) show young flowers. Perhaps we become programmed to think of beauty as something fresh and flawless.

I’m sure many people see aging camellia flowers as ugly, but I wonder if that’s because they don’t look closely at each one as an individual. If we set aside our assumptions about beauty as youthful perfection, we can appreciate details that give character to each old flower.

Camellias (ツバキ)

Camellias (ツバキ) in the garden behind Ritto City Library